Bumtown

My name is Jay Bee. Sometimes I draw, sometimes I sit on my bum. Business as usual.
So you better come home quickly
And you better hide very soon
Or the bunyip’s going to get you
In the bunyip moon

So you better come home quickly

And you better hide very soon

Or the bunyip’s going to get you

In the bunyip moon

Girl with Sword
Colored inks (colored inks suuuuuuck)

Girl with Sword

Colored inks (colored inks suuuuuuck)

Bleeeeeeh I was not feeling this but have to push on.

Bleeeeeeh I was not feeling this but have to push on.

Generic cyberpunk guy for a generic cyberpunk setting! I want to make a transhumanist story some day.

Generic cyberpunk guy for a generic cyberpunk setting! I want to make a transhumanist story some day.

http://actuallyakrampus.tumblr.com/post/98694349668/buttart-bumtown-buttart-no-ones-ever

buttart:

bumtown:

buttart:

no one’s ever gotten pissed at Eminem for being a white rapper, it’s him being a fucking scumbag that ppl hate

Macklemore’s whiteness is also less material to ppl’s annoyance with him than it is his straightness and general clumsiness in trying to…

I cannot deny people’s frustration. At all. My family was raised poor black and Muslim in Johnson City NY and they wished the levels of communication that exist today were in place in the 50s. I hate nothing more than the “one of the good ones” bullshit comments but I can’t spur away any kind of visibility. The “white people won!” group will always exist but if even one person takes the opportunity to dive into the heart of the culture that’s a victory in my book.

buttart:

no one’s ever gotten pissed at Eminem for being a white rapper, it’s him being a fucking scumbag that ppl hate

Macklemore’s whiteness is also less material to ppl’s annoyance with him than it is his straightness and general clumsiness in trying to address queer issues

it doesn’t help that he is Not Good At Rapping

I totally understand people’s frustration but I just can’t be dismissive of people who are at least trying to raise awareness. Same Love may be the most bottom of the barrel simplistic message but it’s a message people are hanging on to. Yes, it’s frustrating that people hold him in higher regard than actual POC queer rappers but let’s face it: these are people who wouldn’t get the message if it wasn’t delivered to them in an easy to digest package. He’s a gateway for many people and I have white friends who started getting into serious rap because Macklemore was their introduction.

My grandparents always taught me to accept whatever help you can get and build from there. Let it serve as an anchor point for future voices to come to the light. I understand the frustration, I’ve been there and felt it, but I’d rather have a clumsy delivery that can be built upon than nothing at all.

"We can’t close our eyes to the plight of the city. Kids, you noticing all this plight?"

*gunshots*

"Roll ‘em up!"

This scene couldn’t be more relevant today.

Deadly Force

I just found my deadly force card from my time in the Navy.  Every service member is required to know it and recite it verbatim when asked.

"Deadly force is that force that a person uses causing, or that a person knows or should know would create a substantial risk of causing, death or serious bodily harm.  Its use may be justified only under conditions of extreme necessity, when all lesser means have failed or cannot reasonably be employed. 

There are 7 justifications as defined by the United States Armed Forces:

1. self defense and defense of others
2. assets involving national security
3. assets not involving national security, but inherently dangerous
4. arrest or apprehension
5. serious offenses against others
6. preventing escape
7. protect public health or safety

The deadly force triangle is opportunity, capability, and intent.  If those three factors don’t exist, you don’t have justification.

Finally, there’s the escalation of force.

1. Presence - being there
2. Verbal - Tell them to Stop
3. Soft Control - handcuffs, flexcuffs, escort
4. Hard Control - hand/knee strikes, OC spray
5. Non-lethal/Intermediate - baton, military working dog
6. Deadly Force

AN AUTHORITY FIGURE BEING PRESENT IS AN ESCALATION. This was hammered into us.  

I used to joke with the watch officer about the justifications because, at the time (I was 18) I thought they were unnecessarily restrictive.  And it’s true, unless you’re on a combat operation, the military is stricter than any police force in America.  But I soon learned that our mere presence is enough to anger people.  Even in friendly countries, we are a foreign element.  We have to conduct ourselves as an exemplary force because, as a lot of chiefs are fond of saying, “One ‘oh shit’ cancels a hundred ‘attaboys.’”

I don’t hate the police.  My parents are police.  My parents also told me never to inherently trust police.  They’re human. They make mistakes. They have their own biases.  But thinking back to my military days, how much I changed as a person and how I perceived the world (the military being one of the few truly integrated forces in America, a figurative melting pot of culture) I understand now.  

What’s happening in Ferguson needs to trigger a serious talk about the role of police in America and the deeply ingrained societal bias against the underprivileged and ethnic minorities.  

Road Not Taken is legit my favorite game right now.

Road Not Taken is legit my favorite game right now.

some incomplete thoughts about comics

buttart:

rubbishtiger:

buttart:

heysawbones:

Why am I so critical of arty, low-effort indie comics?

It’s not like the comic I make isn’t indie. It could probably be higher effort. I blotted Bob’s head out with paint strokes once, which I guess qualifies as “arty”. I like that kind of thing. What I don’t like is 90% of…

i’ve actually thought about (and written about) this in the past, as it’s something that i boggle over too

i’ve come to the conclusion that whether it’s earnest or ironic, it exists, and if someone enjoys it for its aesthetics, more power to the artists, y’know? i see a lot of contemporary art that i find lazy or pretentious, but i’d never say it isn’t art, or has no business in a museum, if that makes any sense. and despite my admitted distaste for “outsider”/”indie” low-effort comix, i find myself completely in love with some of it, like Simon Hanselmann’s comics

i can’t even say why i do love them (it’s a lot of reasons i feel), but i do, and so that must mean the other comics in that similar vein have their fans— people who find no pleasure in superhero comics or los bros hernandez or webcomics but find comfort and beauty in more gestural comics

i’m personally just over trying to tell if someone’s being sincere or not, i’d rather just assume they are and then judge their work beyond that

i just wrote a bunch of words that didn’t really say much i’m sorry

Actually nah that’s a good point— in the end, it probably doesn’t matter if the artist is being sincere or not as long as the reader gets something out of it. Maybe I’m just hung up on a feeling that the artist is looking down their nose at their readers?

I’ll totally cop to the fact that most of my feelings about ~~art comix~~ are also tied up in resentful feelings about academia, sexism in comics, academia in comics, etc.

that i can definitely understand, elitism wtr how “low effort” or artsy a comic is making it more legitimate or something, i think is kind of unfair

like right now i feel like the super indie comic scene that ppl like simon hanselmann is in is downright impenetrable to new talent, because they like a very specific set of aesthetics

i guess it can also be a comic clique thing and i’m partially jealous/resentful, or rather, i like it better when different aesthetics and styles and genres intermix, rather than separate into cliques at all

but i know it’s always gonna happen :[

(also re: sexism/elitism in comics, it bugs me that jaime hernandez and daniel clowes are considered indie comics staples/gurus, but alison bechdel is somehow just a gay or women’s staple, not an all-comics staple?? but that’s a rant for another day)

I disagree with that perception of Bechdel. I remember Barnes and Noble and Borders prominently displaying Fun Home when it came out. She was featured multiple times in anthologies like Best American Comics (curating the. 2011 version I believe) and McSweeney’s. She’s not as famous as Clowes or Hernandez as Fun Home was her break out success, the Bechdel Test has entered mainstream use and I see her work recommended to the same wide audience and circles that include Lynda Barry and Marjane Satrapi.

Wide audience being relative here but if you’ve read Daniel Clowes you probably also know about Bechdel.

Damn, this got here fast. You have no idea how great it is to re-experience one of the stories that actually got me into comics.

Anonymous asked: Yo! A genre question. Why do you think rap is underrepresented in cyberpunk? With all the corruption, violence, and general misdeeds that run rampant in those universes, you'd think it'd be more prevalent, especially among the underground and gangs.

milonogiannis:

Maybe the dudes who set the cyberpunk foundations weren’t into rap? Maybe someone did write a rap cyberpunk thing but it got rejected/never actually seen at a publisher?

We’re at this cool junction in time when it comes to creation and publishing and whatever, where anybody can write what they want and put it out. So I’m more wondering why people aren’t writing the rap cyberpunk stuff they want to read, than wondering why other people didn’t put more rap into their cyberpunks.

(also I have no idea)

The tougher answer is that cyberpunk and science fiction in general are largely written by white men and rap/hip-hop is still seen as the realm of black youths.  The genre themes are similar - minority diaspora, urban decay, corporate takeover, the militarization of police - but there’s few (prolific) people creating it.

There is a similar literary movement called Afrofuturism which examines the history or dilemma of people of color in a science fiction or fantasy setting.  You can see some of this in movies like Riddick with its heavy Islamic overtones or music by Gorillaz, Sun Ra, and Del the Funky Homosapien.